Cyberbullying Essay Example, with Outline

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Cyberbullying Essay Example

Cyberbullying entails the use of chat rooms, websites, instant messaging, and e-mail for deliberately intimidating and antagonizing others. It is variously referred to as online bullying or electronic bullying. To get more insight on cyber bullying, lecturers may give tests and essays on cyber bullying and this is where the services of competent online research writer at Gudwriter will come in. You will get help at an affordable price. Here is a cyber bullying essay sample.

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Is Cyberbullying Worse Than Physical Bullying? Essay Outline

Introduction

Thesis: Given its very nature, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying which is otherwise known as traditional bullying.

Body

Paragraph 1:

While both physical bullying and cyberbullying may result in long lasting effects on the people involved, the two terms have some notable differences.

  • While the former occurs physically, the latter is only possible through electronic gadgets and through the use of the Internet.
  • In traditional bullying, the victim would easily know and access the one bullying them whereas in cyberbullying, it would be difficult to know or trace the bully.

Paragraph 2:

Cyberbullying is particularly worse and more hurtful than physical bullying because of the anonymity attached to it.

  • Since he or she is unknown to the victim, the person doing cyberbullying gets emboldened while the victim continues to suffer from an increased fear factor.
  • “Because it does not occur face-to-face, bullies are able to mete out pain without witnessing the consequences and victims often cannot stand up for themselves, even if they are so inclined.”

Paragraph 3:

Another factor that makes online bullying more hurtful, and is closely related to anonymity, is the ability of the bully to say things that they would not possibly say to their victim physically to their face.

  • When a bully thinks they can continue remaining unknown to the victim and other people, “they are less inhibited in saying things they never would say to a person face-to-face.”
  • A person would not have to be accountable for their actions if they can hide behind a screen through the help of technology.
  • Effectively, this causes the fear of being caught and punished to diminish because the person cannot be identified with an action they committed.

Paragraph 4:

Cyberbullying is also conducted on and through environments that are new and are not inhibited by many traditional limitations.

  • It is not limited by time or place and thus has no set medium, locations, or hours.
  • When one can send their victim hurtful messages throughout at their own pleasure, it feels like there is no rout for escaping or evading the constant attack by an unknown tormentor.

Paragraph 5:

Some people would argue that physical bullying is worse than cyberbullying as it may involve the victim suffering bodily harm from the bully.

  • While it is true that bodily harm are serious to the physical health of the victim, this argument fails to recognize the fact that cyberbullying can cause very serious mental harm to the victim.
  • Mental harm could cause the victim to suffer from self-inflicted bodily harm or even commit suicide.

Conclusion

While bullying in any form is hurtful and harmful, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying in this respect. Cyberbullying has made work easier for bullies because they no longer have to conduct bullying at given times and in given places. Coupled with the fact that it allows for anonymity on the part of the bully, cyberbullying causes more harm.

Is Cyberbullying Worse Than Physical Bullying?

Introduction

It is common knowledge that bullying of any kind through whatever platform is harmful to the victim(s). The matter has however been worsened by technological advancements which have since escalated bullying to a whole new and more dangerous level. This new kind of bullying entails the use of bash or chat rooms, voting booths, websites, instant messaging, and e-mail for deliberately intimidating and antagonizing others. It is variously referred to as cyberbullying, online bullying, or electronic bullying. A measure of mean spiritedness seems to be encouraged by the Internet even though the same Internet allows for communication that is unbridled and undisturbed. Given its very nature, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying which is otherwise known as traditional bullying.

While both physical bullying and cyberbullying may result in long lasting effects on the people involved, the two terms have some notable differences. One of the major differences between “bullying” and “cyberbullying” is that while the former occurs physically, the latter is only possible through electronic gadgets and through the use of the Internet. This is the reason why it is sometimes called online bullying. Another difference is that in traditional bullying, the victim would easily know and access the one bullying them whereas in cyberbullying, it would be difficult to know or trace the bully. In cyberbullying, a bully can disguise their true identity by hiding behind a user name that is pseudonymous (Henkin, 2012). This makes them to be more aggressive in their bullying behavior and thus makes cyberbullying more dangerous as compared to physical bullying.

This anonymity attached to cyberbullying makes it worse and more hurtful than physical bullying. Since the bully is unknown to the victim, he or she gets emboldened while the victim continues to suffer from an increased fear factor. “Because it does not occur face-to-face, bullies are able to mete out pain without witnessing the consequences and victims often cannot stand up for themselves, even if they are so inclined” (Beale & Hall, 2007). This implies that no matter the amount of pain the victim suffers from cyberbullying, there is actually nothing they would do to avert or avoid it as long as the bully persists. Electronic bullying thus becomes so insidious and hurtful largely because of its secretive nature. A tormentor can access the victim at their own pleasure and hurl whatever insults or other hurtful acts or messages to them while remaining rest assured that they are unknown.

Another factor that makes online bullying more hurtful, and is closely related to anonymity, is the ability of the bully to say things that they would not possibly say to their victim physically to their face. According to Beale and Hall (2007), when a bully thinks they can continue remaining unknown to the victim and other people, “they are less inhibited in saying things they never would say to a person face-to-face.” As a matter of fact, even if the victim strives to identify the bully online, they (the bully) can claim that their screen name is being used by someone to cause the bullying. A person would not have to be accountable for their actions if they can hide behind a screen through the help of technology. Effectively, this causes the fear of being caught and punished to diminish because the person cannot be identified with an action they committed. “This phenomenon is referred to as disinhibition and requires that administrators create a comprehensive sunlight plan for bringing cyberbullying out of the shadows…” (Beale & Hall, 2007).

Cyberbullying is also conducted on and through environments that are new and are not inhibited by many traditional limitations. Cyberbullying can be conducted from anywhere and at any time unlike traditional or physical bullying that is only possible through face-to-face interaction and outside the home. It is not limited by time or place and thus has no set medium, locations, or hours. When one can send their victim hurtful messages throughout at their own pleasure, it feels like there is no rout for escaping or evading the constant attack by an unknown tormentor. While traditional bullying never goes beyond the public space into the home, cyberbullying follows one right into their home and into whatever room they might “hide” (Parker, 2014). With the home no longer serving as a safe zone free from bullying, cyberbullying victims continue to get harassed and thus grow increasingly helpless.

Some people would argue that physical bullying is worse than cyberbullying as it may involve the victim suffering bodily harm from the bully. Such arguments hold that bodily harm is more serious than just insults that cause no bodily injuries to the victim (Hunter, 2012). While it is true that bodily harm are serious to the physical health of the victim, this argument fails to recognize the fact that cyberbullying can cause very serious mental harm to the victim. While bodily harm may be treated and see the victim recover fully, mental harm could be as dangerous and as long lasting as to cause the victim to suffer from self-inflicted bodily harm or even commit suicide. Moreover, in physical bullying, the victim has the chance of running away or avoiding bodily harm. In cyberbullying on the other hand, the victim has no leeway of evading the constant attacks.

Conclusion

While bullying in any form is hurtful and harmful, cyberbullying is worse than physical bullying in this respect. In physical bullying, both the victim and the tormentor have to be physically present at the same place and at the same time. Cyberbullying has since made work easier for bullies because they no longer have to conduct bullying at given times and in given places. They can now do it at the comfort of their homes and at whatever time and still reach their target victims with their messages of harassment. The victim can no longer use their home as a safe haven where they can avoid being bullied. Coupled with the fact that it allows for anonymity on the part of the bully, cyberbullying causes more harm and is definitely worse than physical bulling. 

References

Beale, A., & Hall, K. (2007). Cyberbullying: what school administrators (and parents) can do. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 81(1), 8-12.

Henkin, R. (2012). Speaking my mind: confronting bullying: it really can get better. The English Journal, 101(6), 110-113.

Hunter, N. (2012). Cyber bullying. Chicago, IL: Raintree.

Parker, R. J. (2014). Beyond sticks and stones: cyberbullying. North Charleston: Createspace Independent Pub.

Here are the basic steps to follow in writing your research paper.

Cyberbullying Essay Outline

Introduction

Thesis: Acts of cyberbullying have put people through immense suffering that can and should be prevented.

Body

Paragraph 1:

“Victims of cyberbullying can have lasting emotional, concentration and behavioral issues.”

  • These problems may negatively affect their social lives.
  • They may find it challenging to get along with others.
  • They find it difficult to trust other people
  • They are likely to start engaging in alcohol and drug abuse at an early age.

Paragraph 2:

Cyberbullying victims feel powerless and vulnerable as they often find it difficult to feel safe.

  • It is possible for a bully to invade their home at any time of the day.
  • They no longer have a place to ‘hide’.
  • The bullies can choose to remain anonymous as long as they taunt their victims.

Paragraph 3:

Online bullying makes victims feel dissatisfied with who they are as it often attacks them where they are most vulnerable.

  • They begin to develop a feeling of doubt about their self worth and value.
  • They may respond by causing harm to themselves in some way. 

Paragraph 4:

Cyberbullying may be prevented through the monitoring of children’s or teenager’s online activity by their parents or guardians.

  • Parents should know what sites their children visit when online and the people they interact with.
  • They should develop trustworthiness with a child so that they would be ready to willingly reveal their online activity.
  • They may also make use of an iPhone monitoring app such as Pumpic.

Paragraph 5:

Cyberbullying may also be prevented through engagement of parents and youth by schools.

  • A school may create a community where a unified message against cyberbullying would be sent by adults and learners.
  • It may establish a school safety committee and entrust it with discussing and controlling the problems of online bullying.
  • Schools may create cyberbullying rules and policies.

Paragraph 6: 

Cyberbullying is so dangerous that it should be criminalized.

  • It pushes its victims to attempt or actually commit suicide.
  • In 2013, a teenage girl took her own life in the U.S. as a result of being bullied online.

Conclusion

Cyberbullying has far reaching effects on its victims and it should thus be prevented or seriously controlled. It subjects people to emotional torture so much that they begin to doubt their worth and value as human beings. Prevention of this detrimental phenomenon majorly lies with parents and schools.

Cyberbullying Essay Sample 2

Introduction

Cyberbullying refers to electronic aggression whereby such technology as social media, the Internet, gaming environments, and smartphones are deliberately used to threaten, badmouth, humiliate, or harass people. Just like any other form of bullying, cyber-bullying can negatively affect someone’s well-being, reputation, and joy in life. Compared to the “traditional” face-to-face bullying, this form of bullying is more ferocious as it allows bullies to hide behind digital gadgets and taunt their victims as much as they want. It thus magnifies the problem of bullying. Acts of cyber bullying have put people through immense suffering that can and should be prevented.

Victims of cyberbullying can have lasting emotional, concentration, and behavioral issues. These problems may negatively affect their social lives as they may find it challenging to get along with others. They find it difficult to trust other people and are more likely to start engaging in alcohol and drug abuse at an early age. In addition, cyberbullying can make its victims to develop dangerous stigmas and at the same time suffer harmful shame from other people, especially their peers. They can suffer physiological symptoms despite not being threatened physically. They frequently complain of stomach pain and headaches that are usually a result of nervousness (Duverge, 2015). They may also harm themselves by for instance damaging or cutting their skin with razor blades.

Cyberbullying victims also feel powerless and vulnerable as they often find it difficult to feel safe. This typically emanates from the possibility of a bully invading their home at any time of the day, nighttime included, through a cell phone or computer. Unlike initially when they could count themselves safe once they were at home, they no longer have a place to ‘hide’. Additionally, the feelings of fear can escalate due to the fact that the bullies can choose to remain anonymous as long as they taunt their victims. While some cyberbullies choose people they know, these people have no idea who is subjecting them to this immense pain and depression (Schwartz, 2013). The victims thus cannot help but remain wishful that their tormentors could soon stop.

Further, online bullying makes victims feel dissatisfied with who they are as it often attacks them where they are most vulnerable. Consequently, targets of this vice often begin to develop a feeling of doubt about their self-worth and value and may respond by causing harm to themselves in some way (Völlink, Dehue, & Guckin, 2015). For example, if a bully calls a girl fat, the girl may begin to take a crash diet while believing that the bullying will stop if she changes how she looks. There are also other times when victims may try to avoid additional bullying by changing something about their attitude or appearance. Often, the net effect of such self-induced changes is that they are more harmful than beneficial.

Cyberbullying may be prevented through monitoring of children’s or teenager’s online activity by their parents or guardians. Parents should know what sites their children visit when online and the people they interact with over the Internet (Lindeen, 2017). One way to do this would be to develop trustworthiness with a child so that they would be ready to willingly reveal their online activity. Alternatively, a parent can install an iPhone monitoring app such as Pumpic. This way, they would be able to monitor the general online behavior of the child including their social media activity such as Facebook and Instagram as well as their call logs and text messages, including deleted ones. One can also remotely control or block their child’s phone using a personal cell phone or a PC.

Another way of preventing cyberbullying would be through engagement of parents and youth by schools. A school may do this by creating a community where a unified message against cyberbullying would be sent by adults and learners. A school may also establish a school safety committee and entrust it with discussing and controlling the problems of online bullying. Additionally, schools may create rules and policies that govern the vice, including reporting systems for cyberbullying. While taking all these steps, it is important that the school informs parents, children, and the entire school community about their main objectives (Lindeen, 2017). This would improve the effectiveness of the initiatives in alleviating the online bullying problem as perpetuated by the children.

Cyberbullying is so dangerous that it should be criminalized. One of the reasons why this detrimental practice should be a criminal offense is that it pushes its victims to attempt or actually commit suicide. A case that caught the attention of the entire nation in the United States occurred in 2013 when a teenage girl took her own life as a result of being bullied online. The girl in question was known as Hannah Smith and was by the time of her death 14 years old. Some users of ask.fm, a social media site that she frequented, reportedly tormented her to an extent that she could no longer take it (BBC News, 2013). As one may imagine, the young girl must have felt both worthless and helpless and saw death as the ultimate solution. To prevent such unfortunate occurrences in the future, there needs to be a clear law detailing how cyberbullying should be legally dealt with. The absence of such legislation might only imply more suicide cases related to the practice in the country.

Conclusion

Cyberbullying has far reaching effects on its victims and it should thus be prevented or seriously controlled. It subjects people to emotional torture so much that they begin to doubt their worth and value as human beings. One may find it difficult to socialize with others and may resort to being alone or even harm themselves physically with an object. They may further adopt a harmful lifestyle just to change who they are in terms of their appearance. Prevention of this detrimental phenomenon majorly lies with parents and schools. Parents should strive to ensure that their children do not use the Internet to offend others. Similarly, schools should device effective methods and initiatives for preventing children from engaging in online bullying. The government should also come in and criminalize the practice.

References

BBC News, 2013. “Cyberbullying law needed, says children’s commissioner for Wales”. BBC. Retrieved July 3, 2020 from https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-24525491.

Duverge, G. (2015). Digital threats: The impact of cyberbullying. Touro University Worldwide. Retrieved May 22, 2018 from http://www.tuw.edu/content/health/impact-of-cyberbullying/

Lindeen, M. (2017). Digital safety smarts: Preventing cyberbullying. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications.

Schwartz, H. E. (2013). Cyberbullying. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press.

Völlink, T., Dehue, F., & Guckin, C. (2015). Cyberbullying: From theory to intervention. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

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